About DMARC

Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting and Conformance specification

About DMARC

A blueprint for email senders and receivers to collaboratively stop spammers and phishers, DMARC provides a clear path for preventing email scams that put account passwords, bank accounts, credit cards and other sensitive information in the wrong hands. In conjunction with Agari, DMARC can help any business stay on top of their security, with easy to interpret reports and notification.

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What is DMARC?

DMARC is a completely new security framework for email senders and receivers that standardizes how to directly check authenticity of email and the domain level, and how to write policies for treating “bad email.” For the first time ever, with a DMARC record, brands have clear direction on how to collect raw data about their email channel and publish policies to proactively stop spam, phish and malware attacks across the Internet.

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Agari Accelerates DMARC

As a DMARC.org member and contributing author, Agari has joined some of the largest global brands—including AOL, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Yahoo!—to improve email security with the help of DMARC. Agari provides the big data platform to process and interpret raw DMARC data, filling a major gap for organizations that want to reap the benefits of DMARC but lack the infrastructure to do so. Delivered as a cloud-based service, brands simply sign up for Agari and begin processing raw DMARC data for instant analysis—no hardware, software, or development required.

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Trending Story
And then there were two… Aol joins Yahoo in going to DMARC reject

by Patrick Peterson, CEO & Founder of Agari
Today, just a few short weeks after Yahoo! boldly stepped forward to protect Yahoo! users and internet denizens everywhere, Aol followed suit by refusing to allow criminals…

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